Friday, October 31, 2008

Defeat

Well, here is the letter I received from the high school principal yesterday. It really broke my heart. Things are going downhill in this world, for sure, but at least I (and Josi!) tried to make our voice heard.

Dear Ms. Jenna Consolo,

I have received your letter regarding the play "Spring Awakening" and appreciate your concerns. Due to the mature nature of the material, the advisory was sent to the parents of the students who might attend this field trip, and it seems clear that, upon reading the advisory, you have decided that the material is not appropriate for your daughter. I respect your decision, and the right of every parent to arrive at their own decisions regarding this matter. However, not all parents agree with your decisions, therefore, the trip to "Spring Awakening" will take place as planned.

Just to clarify, general school funds were not used, for this field trip. Mr. Lawler, the teacher, purchased these tickets out of an arts grant. No general education state educational funds were used for these tickets.

I am sure that sometime in the near future there will be an opportunity for your daughter, to participate in a theater activity, that will be more to your liking. Know that you will always be notified of any theater activities that the students might be attending, and you, of course, will always have the opportunity to make a decision for your child.

I thank you for your concern for your child, and we will respect your wishes in this matter, regarding your daughter's non-attendance at this particular play.

Sincerely yours,
Diane Klewitz

Well, besides her love of the unnecessary, comma, I think she missed the point, of my letter. I already, know, that my daughter isn't going. I was speaking, in behalf of the other students, that I care about, too.

Oh well. It's a sad state of affairs.

12 comments:

Holly said...

Way too many commas! I think she definitely missed the point. Stupid woman! ;) It's very sad, but at least you voiced your opinion and that letter will be on file. I'd be interested to know if any other parents aren't allowing their kids to go and how many kids actually DO attend.

thisblogisyourblog said...

Have you gotten any response from the other people to whom you sent the letter? (Sorry for the pretentious wording of that--I'm about to criticize her writing mechanics, so I figured I'd better not dangle my prepositions!) Those commas are killers!

Some school administrators are great, but when I was in high school, I spent all of freshman year not knowing who the principal was. The man did not have very much presence. Then, when he was promoted, they moved up one of the vice principals, who seemed much more reactionary than reasonable. I wasn't one of those students who was always at odds with authority, but I certainly disliked THIS particular authority!

Chiapelli Family said...

Well, I really think, that you speak for all parents, and, all moral individauls,.
I am still glad, that you commented, even if it fell, on deaf ears. :)

templework said...

"Mr. Lawler, the teacher, purchased these tickets out of an arts grant."

I wonder what those people who actually endowed that Arts Grant think of Mr. Lawler's taste in "art" (and I use that term very liberally!)

I like what Neal A. Maxwell said that we may not always win in this world - but there should never be any doubt what side we are on!

Bless you for speaking out!

wonder woman said...

This is so very sad. Very, very sad.

Kimberly said...

The problem is that you care more about the other students than the people teaching them do. A sad state of affairs indeed.

Pezlady Jana said...

that's so funny about the commas, because I was thinking the exact same thing! I think you did what was necessary and right, even though they obviously aren't. :]

Luisa Perkins said...

Ugh, I can't believe they went to see that piece of crap. So glad that you objected.

Chris said...

Jenna...

When my daughter Karen was in junior high school she came home very upset one day. I was eventually able to find out that her class had been shown a made-for-TV movie about a southern Nazi who made a run for president. His campaign was cut short because he raped a woman. Apparently, the rape was shown very graphically, including violence and blood. No wonder she was upset! I had no notice about this being shown. When I went to see the Vice Principal (I was directed to him by the Principal), he told me that the children were given an opportunity to opt out of seeing the film. As if you can expect a 13 or 14-year old to make that choice in front of her classmates. Further, there was no way she could imagine what was to be shown. He basically dismissed my concerns, defending the choice of film by saying that the movie depicted a real event that was important in a Social Studies class. This happened in 1990. So, unfortunately, I'm not surprised by your experience. But, as others have said, you spoke up...sometimes that's all we can do.

rjlight said...

Being the commma-loving person I am, even I, found, that, she, used, way, too, many, commas.

Angela said...

There are not even words.....

Josi said...

Argh--that is so frustrating! At least you can have the knowledge of knowing you did the right thing. Even when it doesn't work, it's the right thing. AND they took the time to respond, that means it was noticed even if it wasn't understood. AND maybe it WILL make them think twice about the next one they do. I'm so sorry, though, it's discouraging to not be truly heard.